Posted in Groundbreaking researches

Why Do Some People Crave Spicy Food?

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When it comes to eating spicy food, there are two types of people, those who can’t live without it and those who absolutely hate it. Its really rare for someone to fall in between.

I absolutely love spicy food, I cannot live without “pani puri” at all. So to find the answers to my question, I did some research and was quite surprised when I say the reason, well lets start —

The Basics —

Well, spicy foods originate from one key ingredient, i.e, peppers. There are a lot of varieties  of hot peppers. For some people, spice is not a condiment, its a lifestyle. But what is the reason behind it? Is it because some people have a higher pain threshold in their mouth? Doesn’t the spice hide the flavors of their food? Well, there a little bit of science behind it.

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Capsaicin —

Every food has an impact on our body and every food takes in and uses energy differently depending on their individual body chemistry. But besides this, food impacts our minds as well. If you’ve ever has a really good meal, you may feel very good and happy. This is a primal biological response that stems from our most basic instincts. A full belly means survival and our body rewards us for that, especially if the food is high in quality and nutritious. This rush of feel-good energy comes in part from endorphins, which is a chemical produced in the brain that makes you feel great. Endorphins are natural pain and stress relievers, are linked to sensations of love and happiness, and are also the source of that “runner’s high” that many people experience after working out. But what do endorphins have to do with spicy foods?

Well, the answers lies in the molecular compound of peppers. Spicy peppers contain a compound called capsaicin. The higher the capsaicin amount, the hotter the pepper. If you’ve ever felt the heat after eating spicy foods, capsaicin is the reason. It is also the reason because of which our body gets tricked into thinking that we have literally touched something hot. Ironically, Capsaicin is a well know pain reliever and is claimed to reduce the effects of arthritis pain, dermatological conditions, and neuropathic pain and is included in some over the counter pain-reliever creams. Because of the fact that it relieves pain, it can also help the body to release endorphins in order to block pain receptors.  In other words, foods containing capsaicin pretend to be a physical threat to your body in order to fool it into releasing some good feels (That’s a bit confusing, isn’t it?). So, spices are not only not a threat to our body, they are quite good for it.

The Health Benefits

So how exactly is the power of spiciness being used for larger good? For one thing, as it turns out, cancer cells don’t like capsaicin very much. And while research on this is ongoing, consuming foods with a heated capsaicin kick can aid physical health and wellness in a myriad of other ways, including:

  • Alleviating nasal congestion
  • Headache prevention
  • Allergy relief
  • Blood clot prevention
  • Balancing cholesterol
  •  Healthy blood pressure promotion

Are you a hot sauce addict? Do you love spice a lot? Is “pani puri” your favorite dish? Comment down below your opinion.

Posted in Groundbreaking researches

Groundbreaking Inventions In The Field Of Laser Physics: Groundbreaking Research #001

Laser light can be stretched, amplified, and then compressed to create strong, short pulses of energy. Image by Johan Jarnestad/The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

Hello there, a few days ago, I asked you guys about your views on me starting a series on researches and I received a lot of encouragement. Here is the first post of this series —


So in this post I will be tell you about the research which gifted the researchers a noble price.

So The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the Nobel Prize in Physics 2018 “for groundbreaking inventions in the field of laser physics” with one half to Arthur Ashkin, Bell Laboratories, Holmdel, USA “for the optical tweezers and their application to biological systems” and the other half jointly to Gérard Mourou, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France and University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA and Donna Strickland, University of Waterloo, Canada “for their method of generating high-intensity, ultra-short optical pulses.” Ah man, now this is actually ground breaking. By the way when I first saw this, my reaction was something like this —

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I mean this changes everything!!!!!

Arthur Ashkin invented TWEEZERS which can grab thing as small as an atom!

As every product, these tweezers weren’t that good in the start, a major breakthrough came in 1987, in this year he was successfully able to pick living bacteria!! Gérard Mourou and Donna Strickland paved the way towards the shortest and most intense laser pulses ever created by humankind!!!

The Science behind the laser pulses

Using an ingenious approach, they succeeded in creating ultrashort high-intensity laser pulses without destroying the amplifying material. First they stretched the laser pulses in time to reduce their peak power, then amplified them, and finally compressed them. If a pulse is compressed in time and becomes shorter, then more light is packed together in the same tiny space — the intensity of the pulse increases dramatically.

Man, this is complicated!!


This is still quite a new thing and the innumerable areas of application have not yet been completely explored. This invention has opened a whole new gate in the field of Laser Physics.

The Laureates:

  • Arthur Ashkin, born 1922 in New York, USA. Ph.D. 1952 from Cornell University, Ithaca, USA.
  • Gérard Mourou, born 1944 in Albertville, France. Ph.D. 1973.
  • Donna Strickland, born 1959 in Guelph, Canada. Ph.D. 1989 from University of Rochester, USA.

Prize amount: 9 million Swedish krona, with one half to Arthur Ashkin and the other half to be shared between Gérard Mourou and Donna Strickland.


If you come across an interesting research like this one, please contact me on radthepoet@gmail.com. If I find it really good, I will credit you for giving me the idea and post it on this blog.